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backdrop to make his case to the american people about the fiscal cliff. yesterday treasury secretary tim geithner presented an offer to the congressional leaders including the stipulation that taxes go up on the wealthy. the headlines tell the story. "the washington post" wrote, "obama offers plan for cliff, not compromise." "the new york times." "gop balks at white house plan on fiscal crisis." and "the wall street journal," obama's cliff offer spurned. i want to bring in joanne reed and molly ball, political reporter for "the atlantic." good to see both of you. good morning. >> good to be here. >> mitch mcconnell, we are told, literally laughed at the white house's offer. and if you listen to speaker boehner, it's not going very well. take a listen. >> i'm disappointed in where we are and disappointed in what's happened over the last couple of weeks. but going over the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. >> and the speaker tweeted, "how serious is the white house about avoiding the fi
to handle the fiscal cliff? 48% believe president obama and republicans will reach an agreement but 43% say they won't. meantime, president obama is giving a stern warning to republicans who may be trying to use the debt ceiling as leverage. >> if congress in any way suggests that they're going to tie negotiations to debt ceiling votes and take us to the brink of default once again as part of a budget negotiation, which by the way we have never done in our history until we did it last year, i will not play that game. >> we should say that the president and house speaker john boehner did speak by phone yesterday. that was the first time in a week. no one is saying what the conversation was about. shortly after that call treasury secretary tim geithner went on cnbc and said the white house is ready to go off the cliff. >> if republicans do not agree to that, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff in. >> absolutely. there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest. it's only 2%. >> i want to bring in "usa today" b
, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff in. >> absolutely. there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest. it's only 2%. >> i want to bring in "usa today" bureau chief and welcome to both of you. where are we in these negotiations, susan? >> i think the most encouraging thing was they agreed to the to characterize the phone call. the last time around the characterization of the phone call became a controversy in itself. i think it's pretty clear that the white house and republicans think the white house hand on this is strengthening. we see the polls that you mention, pew polls this week say americans trust the president more, assume if a deal is not reached -- trust the white house more, think if a deal isn't reached it, will be the fault of republicans and it is in fact easier for democrats to go over the fiscal cliff than it is for republicans because then all those tax cuts from the republicans are swept away. but it's too early. it's only december 6. we've got until december 31st and in washington that's a long
with each leader this morning to talk about the fiscal cliff or slope or curve. but whatever you call it, politico's front page headline reads, fiscal cliff deal emerging. it hashes out the flame woframe agreement including $400 billion in cuts to entitlements. but how close are they really? depends on who you ask. >> what's going on between the decision makers is little to nothing. >> you can actually now see what the contours of the deal look like. >> i'm optimistic that we can continue to work together to overt this crisis and sooner rather than later. >> we will not negotiate the end of medicare. i don't know what it is with these republicans. >> it's safer if you're on the progressive end of the political spectrum to go over the fiscal cliff than it is to agree to some of the things they're talking about. >> ruth, where do you stand, deal or no deal? >> not who deal, but who are more pessimistic. the clock is really ticking. about ten legislative days left in the year. outlines are there but the willingness to do it and the ability to get it done in time, i'm more disappointed than
to be digging in on a fiscal cliff deal and so right now it's a stalemate. >> for right now i would say we're nowhere. period. we're nowhere. >> what are the chance we'll go over the live? >> there's clearly chance. >> tuning we'll get a deal by the end. year. >> do i. >> i think we'll go over the cliff. >> republicans are angry the president presented them with an offer they don't think is serious. but the president's new negotiating strategy is clear, don't give in. don't start with concessions. even as some republicans say they don't think they need to put out any kind of formal proposal. let me bring in "the washington post" columnist and our politics reporter. good morning. so the headline in the "new york times" is pushing the gop to negotiate, obama ends giving in. and peter baker writes that president obama has emerged kind of a different style of negotiator in the past week or two, sticking to the liberal line, frustrating the republicans clearly. this is a strategy his base might like but i'm wondering will it make him a better deal maker? >> it just may mean that republicans ult
the fiscal cliff crisis. they will also meet with john boehner. boehner counter proposal yesterday. $600 billion in cuts in entitlement and $250 billion in changes in way the government changes inflation that would impact social security. let me bring in the national journal from the editor. good morning. i want to talk to you about this republican proposal saying republicans in congress want to get serious about asking the wealthiest to pay slightly higher tax rates. we won't be able to achieve a significant balanced approach to the deficit. it does have some revenue in it, even though it's not from tax increases. so what does this opening offer say about where we are in these negotiations? >> well, it seems very difficult to imagine that we're going to be getting to a deal that will handle everything that needs to be addressed before the end of the year. i think the first main thing that needs to be addressed is the question of the tax cuts expiring. and for the obama administration, the question is, is it in their interest to trade tax cuts for the wealthy? increase for the wealthy fo
pelosi was talking about wasn't exactly the tax cuts now, fiscal cliff later. both sides have said this has to be a two-step process, there has to be some kind of commitment in downpayment on taxes and entitlement cuts and sets up a framework for broader and comprehensive tax and entitlement reform next year because it is such a big, huge change to how we tax and how we would provide medicare and medicaid and social security, you can't do it all in four books. this new idea that republicans get more leverage if they give the president taxes now and hold out on, and hold the line on the debt ceiling like they did last summer successfully is something that is new and i think a different kind of two-part plan that republicans are starting to consider as maybe a backup plan that gives them the ability to say we lost the 2% tax hikes now, but we're going to fight later on the debt ceiling. >> let me bring in congressman james lang foford, fifth rankin republican in the house, congratulations, good morning. >> thank you, good morning. >> let me ask you about the possibility of some sort
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7